Parution : Conquered conquistadors : the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan : a Nahua vision of the conquest of Guatemala

Conquered conquistadors : the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan
Conquered conquistadors : the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan

Créateur

Résumé de l’éditeur

« This book is truly a pathbreaking work. No Mesoamericanist or scholar of the Conquest can afford to be without it. » —The Sixteenth Century Journal

« Asselbergs . . . is the first scholar to identify the map as depicting the Quauhquecholteca invasion of Guatemala and to offer an accurate, detailed, and fully contextualized analysis of the document. Asselberg’s book, however, is far more than an art-historical analysis of a single map. Her discussion of the lienzo is so thorough and clearly presented as to make her study possibly the best book yet published on the Spanish (or Spanish-Nahua) conquest of Guatemala. »—Hispanic American

In Conquered Conquistadors, Florine Asselbergs reveals that a large pictorial map, the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan, long thought to represent a series of battles in central Mexico, was actually painted in the 1530s by Quauhquecholteca warriors to document their invasion of Guatemala alongside the Spanish and to proclaim themselves as conquistadors. This painting is the oldest known map of Guatemala and a rare document of the experiences of indigenous conquistadors. The people of the Nahua community of Quauhquechollan (present-day San Martín Huaquechula), in central Mexico, allied with Cortés during the Spanish-Aztec War and were assigned to the Spanish conquistador Jorge de Alvarado. De Alvarado and his allies, including the Quauhquecholteca and thousands of other indigenous warriors, set off for Guatemala in 1527 to start a campaign against the Maya. The few Quauhquecholteca who lived to tell the story recorded their travels and eventual victory on the huge cloth map, the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan. Conquered Conquistadors, published in a European edition in 2004, overturned conventional views of the European conquest of indigenous cultures. American historians and anthropologists will relish this new edition and Asselbergs’s astute analysis, which includes context, interpretation, and comparison with other pictographic accounts of the « Spanish » conquest.

Sommaire

  • xi Foreword by Davíd Carrasco
  • xiii Acknowledgments
  • 1 1. Introduction
    • 4 Definition of the Research Problem
    • 7 Terminology and Orthography
    • 8 Nahua Pictography
    • 11 Lienzos and Indigenous Cartography
    • 15 Indigenous and European Cartography
    • 18 Colonial Indigenous Maps
    • 20 Summary
  • 21 2. Theory and Methodology
    • 22 Theory
    • 26 Methodology
    • 32 Summary
  • 35 3. Quauhquechollan
    • 36 Prehispanic History of Quauhquechollan
    • 39 Quauhquechollan and the Triple Alliance
    • 43 Arrival of the Spaniards
    • 48 Quauhquechollan’s Indigenous Historical Record
    • 49 Genealogía de Quauhquechollan-Macuilxochitepec
    • 55 Codex Huaquechula
    • 62 Mapa Circular de Quauhquechollan
    • 70 Summary
  • 73 4. The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan: The Document
    • 73 History of the Document and Previous Publications
    • 75 The Cloth
    • 76 Creation of the Painting
    • 77 Glosses
    • 78 Original(s) and Copies
    • 79 Summary
  • 81 5. The “Spanish” Conquest of Guatemala
    • 83 The Conquest of Guatemala: Sources
    • 87 Pedro de Alvarado’s 1524 Campaign of Conquest
    • 89 1524–1527
    • 91 Jorge de Alvarado’s 1527–1529 Campaigns of Conquest
    • 95 Indigenous Conquistadors
    • 99 Motivations for Participation
    • 104 Tlaxcalteca and Quauhquecholteca Conquistadors
    • 106 1529–1544
    • 112 Situation of the Former Conquistadors in the Decades Following
    • the Conquest
    • 119 Summary
  • 123 6. Basic Pictographic Conventions Used in the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan
    • 124 People
    • 127 Place Glyphs
    • 127 Roads with Footprints and Horses’ Hoofprints
    • 128 Rivers
    • 128 Scenes of War and Conquest
    • 128 Quauhquecholteca War Emblems
    • 131 A Spanish Banner
    • 131 Weapons
    • 132 Scenes of Rebellion
    • 132 Kaqchikel Traps
    • 134 Dances
    • 135 Houses
    • 135 Marketplaces
  • 137 7. The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan: A Reading
    • 138 Initial Scene at Quauhquechollan
    • 143 Army Departing from Quauhquechollan
    • 144 Places from Which Indigenous Captains and Soldiers Were Gathered
    • 146 Scenes Depicted in the Left-Hand Part of the Document (Mexico)
    • 150 Soconusco and Retalhuleu
    • 152 Zapotitlan and Suchitepequez
    • 155 Quetzaltenango
    • 158 Olintepeque and Totonicapan
    • 163 Chichicastenango, Olintepeque, Comalapa
    • 165 Chimaltenango
    • 169 The Narrative, Part 1
    • 169 A Campaign from Chimaltenango to Utatlan
    • 172 A Campaign from Chimaltenango to Petapa and Tzonteconapan
    • 176 A Campaign from Chimaltenango to Pochutla
    • 181 Escuintla
    • 184 The Narrative, Part 2
    • 184 The Volcán de Agua and Quilizinapa
    • 187 The City of Santiago at Almolonga (Ciudad Vieja)
    • 190 A Dance for the Dead
    • 192 A Campaign from the City of Santiago to Verapaz and the Cuchumatanes
    • 197 The Narrative, Part 3
    • 199 Summary
  • 203 8. The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan: Interpretation
    • 204 Narrative Structure and Textual Analysis
    • 211 Layout and Orientation
    • 212 A Familiar Format: The Mapa de Cuauhtinchan no. 2
    • 218 Set Formats for Conquest and Migration Stories
    • 221 Where Was the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan Made?
    • 223 Function and Use
    • 228 Summary
  • 231 9. Other Pictographic Accounts of the “Spanish” Conquest
    • 232 The Lienzo de Tlaxcala
    • 235 The Lienzo de Analco
    • 236 References to Other Pictorials Dealing with the “Spanish” Conquest
    • 238 Spanish-Indigenous Alliances as Represented by the Tlaxcalteca and the Quauhquecholteca
    • 239 Initial Scenes
    • 242 Similarities and Differences
    • 244 Function and Use
    • 245 The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan and Lienzo de Tlaxcala, and Their Contribution to Our Understanding of the Conquest of Guatemala
    • 248 Summary
  • 251 10. Conclusions
    • 252 The Role of the Quauhquecholteca in the Spanish Conquest
    • 253 Decipherment of the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan and Its Rhetoric
    • 254 Provenance, Purpose, and Message of the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan, and the Time and Context of Its Creation
    • 257 Future Research
  • 259 Notes
  • 297 Appendixes
    • 297 1. AGN Tierras Vol. 2683, Exp. 4, No. 164: Real cédula (1535) and merced (1545)
    • 301 2. Text in the upper left-hand corner of the Mapa Circular de Quauhquechollan
    • 305 3. Paso y Troncoso’s description of the Lienzo de Quauhquechollan (1892–1893)
    • 309 4. AGI Justicia 291: A selection of testimonies
    • 319 5. AGI Guatemala 52: Tlaxcalteca testimonies
    • 323 6. AGI Guatemala 53: Testimonies of indigenous conquistadors from Guatemala
    • 331 7. AGI Guatemala 41: Letter to the king by Jorge de Alvarado (1534)
    • 335 8. AGI Justicia 199: Encomiendas granted to Jorge de Alvarado
  • 337 Bibliography
  • 361 Index
    • Map Supplement: Lienzo de Quauhquechollan

Informations pratiques

  • Édition : New ed., illustrated ed.
  • Editeur : Boulder, Colo. : University Press of Colorado
  • Date de parution : [2008]
  • Description matérielle : 1 vol. (XV-372 p.) : ill., couv. ill. ; 23 cm + 1 affiche (47 x 64 cm)
  • Collection : (Mesoamerican worlds)
  • Bibliogr. p. 337-359. Index
  • ISBN 978-0-87081-899-8 (br.)

Localisations

Lienzo de Quauhquechollan. Photograph by Bob Schalkwijk (2001). Courtesy of the Museo Casa del Alfeñique, Puebla, Mexico.
Lienzo de Quauhquechollan. Photograph by Bob Schalkwijk (2001). Courtesy of the Museo Casa del Alfeñique, Puebla, Mexico.
  1. Gratuit dans le cadre de la pandémie de COVID-19. []

Olivier Jacquot

Coordonnateur de la recherche > Délégation à la Stratégie et à la recherche > Bibliothèque nationale de France

Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search