Thèse : “The rupture generation” : nineteenth-century Nahua intellectuals in Mexico City, 1774-1882

Créateur

  • Segovia Liga, Argelia. Auteur
  • Jansen, M.E.R.G.N. Directeur
  • May Castillo, M. Directeur

Résumé

This current dissertation explores several ideas about the construction of the Nahua intellectual tradition in 19th century-Mexico. Initially, the argument of this dissertation focuses on examining the intellectual tradition among Indigenous Peoples in Mesoamerica after the European invasion of the Americas. As a result of the Spanish colonization of Mesoamerica, Indigenous Peoples in the capital of New Spain continued developing their own intellectual tradition by following two possible paths. One group of indigenous intellectuals decided to continue with their intellectual production outside of the Spanish colonial institutions. A second group of indigenous intellectuals opted for continuing with their intellectual labors under the sponsorship of the colonial authorities. In this way the intellectual tradition of the Nahua people continued during the entire colonial period. However, during the first decades of the 19th century, with the issuing of the Constitution of Cadiz and the independence of New Spain, the indigenous intellectual phenomenon within the established institutions in Mexico City changed dramatically, but it did not cease. This dissertation explores the changes that Nahua intellectuals who worked within colonial institutions in Mexico City experienced during the first decades of independent government, and examines how they continued with their indigenous intellectual tradition.

Sommaire

  • Acknowledgements 1
  • Archival Abbreviations 3
  • Introduction 4
  • Chapter 1 Studying Early Nineteenth-Century Nahua Intellectuals in Mexico City 10
    • Introduction 10
    • 1.1 Statement of the Research Project 12
      • 1.1.1 Statement of the Problem 15
      • 1.1.2 Identifying Nineteenth Century Nahua Intellectuals 21
      • 1.1.3 Analysis on a Few Nineteenth-Century Nahua Intellectuals 23
      • 1.1.4 Studying Indigenous Intellectuals through Primary Sources 24
    • 1.2 Conclusion to Chapter 1 26
  • Chapter 2 Methodology: On the Analysis of Primary Sources 28
  • Introduction 28
    • 2.1 On the Analysis of Primary Sources 29
    • 2.2 Contextualizing the Terms “Indigenous” and “Indio” 31
    • 2.3 An Historical Understanding of the Term “Nahua” 36
    • 2.4 The Definition of the Term “Intellectual” and its Construction as a Concept 38
    • 2.5 Approaching the Concept of “Indigenous Intellectuals” 45
    • 2.6 “The Rupture Generation:” On Generation Units and Ethnic Bonds 49
    • 2.7 Recent Historiography on Indigenous Intellectuals in Colonial and Nineteenth-Century
    • Mexico 56
    • 2.8 Conclusion to Chapter 2 62
  • Chapter 3 The Nahua Intellectual Tradition in Mesoamerica and New Spain 65
    • Introduction 65
    • 3.1 On Intellectualism in Mesoamerica 66
      • 3.1.1 The Mesoamerican Intellectual Tradition 69
      • 3.1.2 The Nahua Intellectual Tradition in the Valley of Mexico 75
    • 3.2 The Spanish Colonial Period: Continuity of the Nahua Intellectual Tradition in the Capital of New Spain 81
    • 3.3 Systematization of Nahua Education as a Process of Colonization85
      • 3.3.1 The Colegio de San José de los Naturales (1527) 87
      • 3.3.2 The Colegio Imperial de Santa Cruz de Tlatelolco (1536) 90
      • 3.3.3 The Colegio de San Juan de Letrán (1548) 93
      • 3.3.4 The Real y Pontificia Universidad de México (1551) 95
      • 3.3.5 The Colegio Seminario de San Gregorio (1586) 98
      • 3.3.6 The Real Academia de San Carlos de las Nobles Artes de la Nueva España (1784) 100
    • 3.4 Conclusion to Chapter 3 102
  • Chapter 4 Nahua Intellectuals at the Dawn of the Nineteenth Century in Mexico City 104
    • Introduction 104
    • 4.1 An Overview on Indigenous Political Participation during the Spanish Colonial Era in
    • Mexico City 107
      • 4.1.1 The Parcialidades 109
      • 4.1.2 Indigenous Cabildos, Cajas de Comunidades and Cofradías 110
      • 4.1.3 Indigenous Participation through Educational Institutions 114
    • 4.2 The “Rupture Generation:” Biographical Sketches of Early Nineteenth Century Nahua
    • Intellectuals 118
      • 4.2.1 Pedro Antonio Patiño Ixtolinque (1774-1834) 119
      • 4.2.2 Juan de Dios Rodríguez Puebla (1798-1848) 129
      • 4.2.3 Faustino Galicia Chimalpopoca (1805-1882) 140
    • 4.3 Conclusion to Chapter 4 149
  • Chapter 5 The Rupture Generation of Nahua Intellectuals and their Early Works 151
    • Introduction 151
    • 5.1 The Unsteady Spanish Years: The Political Position of Nahua Intellectuals 152
      • 5.1.1 Pedro Patiño Ixtolinque: The Artist, the Regidor and the Ayuntamiento 157
      • 5.1.2 Juan de Dios Rodríguez Puebla: The ‘Indio Constitucional’ 172
    • 5.2 Mexico Taking Shape: The Turbulent Decade of Mexican Independence 184
    • 5.3 Conclusion for Chapter 5 188
  • Chapter 6 Land and Parcialidades under Attack 191
    • Introduction 191
    • 6.1 Education as the Basis of the New Mexican Citizenship: The Hard Battle for the Colegio de
    • San Gregorio 192
    • 6.2 Weakening Indigenous Autonomy: Parcialidades Come under Attack 213
    • 6.3 The Land Protectors: Indigenous Intellectuals as Defenders of Communal Lands 224
    • 6.4 Conclusion to Chapter 6 239
  • Chapter 7 Faustino Galicia Chimalpopoca: The Last Tlacuilo 242
    • Introduction 242
    • 7.1 Ihcuac tlahtolli ye miqui (When a Language Dies): The Decline of the use of Nahuatl in
    • Bureaucratic and Legal Spheres in Mexico City 244
    • 7.2 Chimalpopoca: The Political Figure 249
    • 7.3 The Life of a Nahua Scholar: Chimalpopoca’s Active Academic Participation in MidNineteenth Century Mexico 255
    • 7.4 Chimalpopoca the Tlacuilo: Researcher, Copyist, Paleographer, Translator and Member of
    • the SMGE 261
    • 7.5 The Bitter Years of the Reforma: Chimalpopoca as a Defender of Indigenous Land 267
    • 7.6 The Period of the Second Mexican Empire 279
      • 7.6.1 Chimalpopoca’s Presence in Maximilian’s Court 280
      • 7.6.2 The Culmination of Nahua Collective Efforts: The Junta Protectora de las Clases
    • Menesterosas 292
    • 7.7 The Collapse of the Second Mexican Empire and its Intellectuals: The End of the “Rupture
    • Generation” 301
    • 7.8 Conclusion to Chapter 7 303
  • Conclusion 307
  • Bibliography 316
  • Abreviations Used 316
  • Archival Documents Cited 316
  • Printed Primary Source Records 334
  • Secondary Sources Cited 340
  • Summary in English 371
  • Nederlandse samenvatting 374
  • Curriculum Vitae 377

Informations pratiques



Citer ce billet
Olivier Jacquot (2022, 2 juillet). Thèse : “The rupture generation” : nineteenth-century Nahua intellectuals in Mexico City, 1774-1882. Amoxcalli. Consulté le 29 mai 2024, à l’adresse https://doi.org/10.58079/b3ob

Olivier Jacquot

Chargé de collections : manuscrits des fonds américains, Service des manuscrits ORientaux (SOR), département des Manuscrits (MSS), Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF)

Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search